The Open Research Centre project of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and TechnologySITE MAPJAPANESE
About NANA
Three Aims
Features
Schedule Chart
Project Chart
Project Team
List of Researchers
About NANA

Features

A Nihon Buyo course of studies at a university level is rare. The Department of Theatre, Nihon University College of Art, offers such a course. Most students entering the course have already been trained by a master from childhood, and they are generally quite disciplined. This traditional training system of Japanese performing arts may influence the character of these students in terms of endowing them with perseverance, discipline and a conventional sense of decorum.
The course aims to train students with IT by which their basic skills can be checked. This new method is different from the one-to-one instruction in the traditional training system. This method can break through the old system and contribute to the cultivation of skilled and specialized performers of Nihon Buyo.
Joint research with another college Since the project started joint research with Nihon University College of Science and Technology in 2006, we have much more developed the project's research that integrates the humanities and science.
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What is ORC (Open Research Centre) project?
The ORC project is organized by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology to raise the level of academic research at private universities.
The university putting the ORC project into execution can accept scholars with various backgrounds from outside institutions. Project achievements must be widely released. For example, rare materials collected by the project will be exhibited. Also, the university will maintain any facilities or equipment essential to the open research project.
The ORC project of Nihon University College of Art adopted by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology aims to create a digital archive of Nihon Buyo (Classical Japanese dance) and other famous Asian performing arts. With the motion-capture equipment, which can record the movement of dancers from various sides, process the recorded images, and represent the movement in 3-D, the movements of Nihon Buyo and other Asian performing arts can be captured and these recorded images added to the art archive of the College. This archive will be available for further research and education in the hopes of further development and exchange in performing arts.
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